2 Things All Great Leaders Do Well

Joel WebbonFood for ThoughtLeave a Comment

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June 14, 2014

They say that the summer season is always a little slower for churches. This tends to be exceptionally true for our church considering that many of our congregants are college students, most of which leave campus to go home for the summer. In order to redeem this slower season, I attempt to use the summer as an opportunity to develop new leaders. Healthy churches are constantly developing new leaders, so they can start new groups, for new people. In light of this, I’ve given quite a bit of thought towards the topic of leadership and wanted to share a few of my thoughts with you.

True leaders are concerned with meeting others’ needs, not just meeting their own need of being needed.

1. True leaders are concerned with meeting others’ needs, not just meeting their own need of being needed.
True leaders aren’t merely trying to fill the void caused by their own personal fear of insignificance. I believe that the biggest obstacle hindering us from becoming true leaders is the fear of insignificance. I can assure you that finding significance is not the solution. The solution is to be healed of our own insecurity and our pride. We need to stop caring about our own significance and to start caring about others. Significance doesn’t come from being a leader, but from being a child of God.

True leaders always have a context.

2. True leaders always have a context.
Mother Theresa said, “My people are hungry.” Martin Luther King Jr. said, “My people are oppressed.” The question is: What is your context? Meaning, who are your people? True leaders have a deep sense of commitment to a specific group of people. There is no leadership without context. To be a leader you must ask the question: Who am I going to lead? This question is answered by first asking: Who am I going to choose to belong to? True leaders choose not to view their context as coincidence, but rather hold a deep belief that they have been called there even if it’s just a temporary season. Their calling is not to something, but to someone. It is a calling to a certain place, at a certain time, with a certain people. They are committed to those people because they love those people. Therefore, when a need arises in those people’s lives they are the first to recognize it and the first to act.

I know only sharing two things doesn’t sound like much, but if I ever actually figure out how to do these two things well, maybe I’ll come up with some more.

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Joel Webbon is the Preaching and Vision Pastor at The Response Church. In addition to pastoring, he is passionate about helping to teach and develop young church planters. He and his wife Megan live in San Diego, CA.